September 10th, 2015, 8:36 pm
#1
* Wichita ** Wichita *
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Planning to smoke a load of freshly caught salmon tomorrow and will follow the process Yoder_Herb outlined here viewtopic.php?f=45&t=235&hilit=+salmon

I should have about 15 pounds of finished product. What are some serving suggestions or favorite ways you have used the smoked salmon once done.

Thanks

Durango 24
September 10th, 2015, 11:19 pm
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On crackers, bagels, with eggs for breakfast, over rice as an entrée, as an appetizer, as the center of a "picking party" (just put it out and give everyone a fork), etc. My wife's favorite is a morning bagel with cream cheese and salmon.

Yoder_Herb
September 11th, 2015, 3:48 pm
#3
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Sounds great. Thanks.

Durango 24
January 7th, 2016, 10:40 pm
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Very interesting method for the relatively high temperature smoking of salmon.
One question I have is the "preferred dry wood" to use during the smoking process: is dry oak a satisfactory wood to use or are there better choices? I saw a few salmon smoking "You-Tube videos" some of which suggested hickory is a harsh smoke for salmon. Any guidance would be appreciated for I hate to waste several pounds of salmon, oak and 20 hours of my time and effort.

January 7th, 2016, 11:40 pm
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The pellets mix I use are about 60% oak, 20% cherry and 20% pecan.

Yoder_Herb
January 8th, 2016, 11:20 am
#6
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I am a "stick burner" using a Yoder Cheyenne to do my Salmon smoking. I have available oak, hickory and maple in my "dry" wood stock (I live on 15 wooded acres in East Tennessee with the above woods normally available). I also have a small supply of dry apple wood I could use. If I was in the Pacific Northwest I would use alder wood since I really like its flavor on fish; but, alas the Mississippi is a real block to this supply.

January 8th, 2016, 11:36 am
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I figured that you were using a wood pit. Of the woods you mention, oak or maple would be my picks for salmon.

Yoder_Herb
January 8th, 2016, 9:27 pm
#8
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In the preparation for the brining procedure is the salmon's skin totally removed. If not, is it removed at any part of the smoking process to insure a perfectly smoked and cured salmon fillet?
I frequently grill salmon, on my Holland indirect propane grill (~350 F). I start with the salmon skin side down on the grill then when I turn it over I remove the skin to finish the grilling process. Note: I use alder wood to "mimic" smoking during the grilling process (~45 min).

January 9th, 2016, 8:30 am
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Personally, I prefer to have the skin removed before the brining orocess. I think that the end product is much better.

Yoder_Herb
January 14th, 2016, 3:19 pm
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I completed my first Herb's Dry Brined Smoked Salmon on our Yoder Cheyenne Stick Burner. All went well with the processes as you advised me above! However, I did fail to follow your recipe’s recommended 6 hour maximum in the Brining Mixture; I red elsewhere in this Forum that brining times were not real sensitive [‘Recipies’- ‘Seafood ‘ (viewtopic.php?f=45&t=235 )]:
jeetS “I did a couple salmon two different times last week. Used a very similar brine. First batch I brined for about 12 hrs and the second batch about 20hrs. It seems that it didn’t get more salty with the longer brine. Wasn’t too dried out either. Makes it easy to brine overnight or one evening and smoke the next evening."
I brined our salmon overnight (actually 11 hours) and it was a bit salty for my taste; however, my wife really likes her food salty and thought it was great. Note: I am afflicted with high blood pressure so I watch my sodium levels and do not salt over that which a ‘conservative cook’ seasons their “cuisine.” My next batch will not exceed your recommended six hour brine (however, I looked at the brined salmon in the Ziploc bag at the 6 hour point and noted that not all the “dry mixture” had been dissolved into solution; so, I figured it needed a little longer [my operational adage is “if a little bit is good a whole lot has to be better” which is not always wise!!!]. Thanks for your advice and counsel; next time, I will be much more careful in following your “expert instructions!”

February 3rd, 2016, 4:20 pm
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I really enjoy some whole wheat cracker with garlic spread and capers topped with very slim slices of the smoked salmon. Have never had anyone turn these down.

February 3rd, 2016, 7:20 pm
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OK, you are talking about fully cured salmon, like LOX. The brining process for this takes days. The recipe that I posted is for a flash cure of the outside of the salmon. When it is cooked, it is still somewhat flaky and breaks apart easily, just not like fresh cooked salmon.

Yoder_Herb

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