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August 25th, 2018, 3:15 pm
#1
* Abilene ** Abilene *
  • Joined: August 25th, 2018, 1:59 pm
  • Posts: 3

This post is something of an introduction and to share a cook with my Yoder Loaded Wichita.

I've had a number of BBQs and Smokers in the past, but this is my first experience with a stick burner. I'm something of a purist in my cooking so the idea of managing a fire appeals to me. It was just coincidence I found this smoker. I had been browsing for them locally and happened across one online about two weeks ago. Gently used and in excellent condition. Price was right otherwise I wouldn't have driven 600 miles to pick it up.

Last weekend I tried my first smoke.

Decided if I was going to light a fire, I might as well load it up. So my first cook (and attempt) at using this smoker included a full brisket, three pork butts and a rack of spare ribs. Plus I decided to cook beans rather then use a water pan. Over 40lbs of meat and not too cheap. Learned alot about fire management along the way.

All in all it turned out great.

IMG-0445.JPG


Brisket took about 13.5 hours
Pork Shoulders took about 9-10
Ribs took about 6
Beans cooked for 7

I do think I was near the physical maximum for space on this unit though... There was enough meat to block the airflow and setup a major temperature gradient.

Currently the fleet includes a Large Big Green Egg, a 22" Weber Smokey Mountain, a dedicated Pizza Oven (Blackstone) and the Yoder.

Hardest part thus far was finding suitable fire wood. Most of the wood around here (Saskatchewan, Canada) isn't really suited for smoking. I managed to find a bunch of maple and augmented that with hickory for the cook.

Today I'm doing beef ribs.

...plan is to do a suckling pig soon.

August 25th, 2018, 3:26 pm
#2
* Abilene ** Abilene *
  • Joined: August 25th, 2018, 1:59 pm
  • Posts: 3

Don't have a hosting account but figured I'd share this picture too...

IMG-0444.JPG

September 15th, 2018, 8:24 pm
#3
* Abilene ** Abilene *
  • Joined: August 25th, 2018, 1:59 pm
  • Posts: 3

And for anyone still paying attention and curious... a 65lb pig is about the maximum one can reasonably fit on this smoker

Piggy.jpg


...turned out delicious (although had to be rotated carefully during the cook due to the enormous temperature gradient)

Cheers

June 9th, 2019, 6:32 pm
#4
* Abilene ** Abilene *
  • Joined: June 1st, 2019, 8:32 pm
  • Posts: 6

Froggie wrote:Don't have a hosting account but figured I'd share this picture too...

IMG-0444.JPG
Froggie wrote:And for anyone still paying attention and curious... a 65lb pig is about the maximum one can reasonably fit on this smoker

Piggy.jpg


...turned out delicious (although had to be rotated carefully during the cook due to the enormous temperature gradient)

Cheers

Hello!
I am really curious about your pig cooking technique ( rubs, temperature and time involved-pit temp and meat temp and where you poked it to check doneness.) Last time I ever helped with a pig roast was on a rotisserie barrel cooker mounted on a trailer (rented), and that was 40+ years ago, and I didn't know (nor do I remember what I did know) anything about hog roasting. I know I had a lot of beer, helped tend fire and stayed awake all night and half the next day.

I just got a Witchita Loaded, and seeing this makes me think someday about trying perhaps a smaller pig, but with tips from you!

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