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August 13th, 2017, 5:02 pm
#1
* Wichita ** Wichita *
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  • Joined: July 18th, 2016, 8:42 pm
  • Posts: 110
  • Location: Houston, TX

Do all the Yoder pipe smokers have the pipe seams at the bottom? I initially thought it was just bad luck, but my main cooker pipe and the firebox pipe both have their seams turned down (like it is a design decision), which makes it more difficult to clean the unit. I thought about grinding them smooth, but I was concerned it might weaken the welds.

Seams at the bottom:
Image

I clean out my firebox a lot, and I'm constantly cursing this seam because I can't shovel or rake the bottom without interference:
Image

Why can't the fabricators turn those welds towards the back so they won't be in the way of cleaning up the grease in the cooker or the ashes in the firebox?

Yoder Loaded Wichita 2016
Large Big Green Egg 2014
August 17th, 2017, 9:19 pm
#2
* Wichita ** Wichita *
User avatar
  • Joined: July 18th, 2016, 8:42 pm
  • Posts: 110
  • Location: Houston, TX

Also, the transition into the drain pipe could be better (the pipe seam doesn't help here either). The weld around that hole keeps debris from flowing into the bucket. When I rinse my smoker with a hose after my cooks, I have to frequently use my hand to push pieces of crud down the hole. Not a big deal, but add this to the long "wish list" of improvements we customers would love to see.
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There's already a good thick weld around the outside of the pipe, so maybe the internal weld isn't really needed anyway, or at least it could be ground smooth or contoured for good drainage.
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I've been using Lang's steam clean method to keep my cooker clean and ready to go for the next cook. After I finish cooking, I throw an extra log on the fire to raise the temperature a bit, and then I use my hose nozzle's "center" setting (it has individual jet streams that are strong enough to remove stuck-on debris and yet uses very little water) to spray off the grates, heat management plate, and the inside of the cooker. When the cooker is hot enough (220+) it steams the water and does a good job of cleaning itself. Then I put all the grates back in and while the fire finishes burning down the inside of the cooker stays hot long enough to get completely dry before it cools down enough to put the cover back on. It takes a little extra effort, but when I get ready to cook the next time everything is clean and ready to go, and the cooker smells amazing when I open the door - no rancid meat smells, just the sweet smell of clean-burned oak.

Yoder Loaded Wichita 2016
Large Big Green Egg 2014

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